Worldwide Illustrated Stamp Identifier - Cyrillic

The purpose of the Worldwide Illustrated Stamp Identifier is to provide a visual tool to assist in identifying the country of origin of particularly challenging stamps. On this page are stamps inscribed using Cyrillic writing. Cyrillic was first used in the 10th century AD for writing the Old Church Slavonic language. Influenced by the Greek alphabet, the Cyrillic alphabet has been adapted as the basis of the written forms of over 50 different languages including Slavic languages such as Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian, Ukrainian and Belarusian as well as non-Slavic languages including Mongolian, Kazakh, Uzbek, Kyrgyz and Tajik. Cyrillic inscriptions are found on stamps from Russia Central Asia, and Eastern Europe.

Stamps With Cyrillic Inscriptions

Bulgaria


1879
Lion of Bulgaria


1901
Cherry Wood Cannon - Independence Anniversary


1901
Tsar Ferdinand


1911
Tsar Assen's Tower


1971
Soccer Player



Finland


1858
Coat of Arms


1860
Coat of Arms


1873
Hangö-Hyvinge Railway Stamp



Montenegro


1896
Monastery at Cetinje


1907
Prince Nicholas I


1843
Italian Occupation



Russia


1889-92
Imperial Eagle


1909-12
Imperial Eagle


1913
Catherine II


1964
Kremlin


1965
World Figure Skating Champions


1919
Army of the North


Revenue
Court Fees


1868
Offices in Turkey



Serbia


1880
King Milan I


2009
Laying of St Sava's Temple Foundation Stone


1942-43
Issued Under German Occupation


1943
Occupation Official



Slovenia


1919
Chain Breaker


1920
Freedom


1919
Newspaper Stamp



Ukraine


1918
Trident


1918
Trident


1992
World Congress of Ukrainian Lawyers



Yugoslavia


1921
King Alexander




See Also

The Worldwide Illustrated Identifier Start Page

Stamps with Chinese Characters

Stamps with Asian Scripts

Stamps with Arabic Scripts

Stamps Using Greek, Hebrew and Other Writing Systems

Stamps with No Country Name Inscription




Stamp Collecting Articles

Introduction to Stamp Identification
Minor variations in collectible stamps can mean the difference between a common item and a great rarity. This introduction to the art and science of stamp identification covers provides an invaluable overview to the field covering such topics as finding your stamp in a catalogue, design variations, watermarks, printing methods and papers.

Understanding Stamp Values
The subject of stamp valuation is a deceptively complex one. While at first glance, determining the value of a stamp might appear to be a simple matter of turning to one of the many available reference catalogues, in fact the stamp catalogue is just the beginning of the process. This overview presents some of the major topics in stamp valuation, setting you on course to making confident purchases and understanding the ultimate worth of your collection.

The Grinnell Missionaries - Stamp Collecting's Greatest Controversy
First seen in 1919 when high school teacher and stamp collector George Grinnell claimed to have discovered dozens of rare early Hawaiian stamps, the Grinnell Missionaries have become perhaps the longest running controversy in stamp collecting. To this day experts and collectors alike still debate whether they are clever forgeries or the find of a lifetime.

The Hradcany Issue - Czechoslovakia's First Stamps
Issued beginning December 1918, the first stamps of Czechoslovakia offer an affordable treat for the philatelic specialist. Known as the Hradcany issue, there are five basic types accompanied by a wealth of variations in color, paper types, perforations and plate flaws.



Home