Worldwide Illustrated Stamp Identifier - Other Languages

The purpose of the Worldwide Illustrated Stamp Identifier is to provide a visual tool to assist in identifying the country of origin of particularly challenging stamps. On this page are stamps inscribed using writing systems that do not fit neatly into the other categories of the illustrated identifier. The Greek alphabet is one of the world's first true alphabets was the ancestor of numerous other European and Middle Eastern scripts, including Cyrillic and Latin. Others in this grouping include the Hebrew alphabet which is used in Israel, and Armenian.



Armenia


1921
Ruin in City of Ani



Crete


1898
10 paras - Blue


1900
Hera



Ethiopia


1895
Menelik II


1895
Lion of Judah



Greece


1861
Hermes


1889-95
Hermes


1927
Dodecanese Costume


1934
Athens Stadium



Israel


1948
Ancient Judean Coins




See Also

The Worldwide Illustrated Identifier Start Page

Stamps with Cyrillic Writing

Stamps with Chinese Characters

Stamps with Asian Scripts

Stamps with Arabic Scripts

Stamps with No Country Name Inscription




Stamp Collecting Articles

Introduction to Stamp Identification
Minor variations in collectible stamps can mean the difference between a common item and a great rarity. This introduction to the art and science of stamp identification covers provides an invaluable overview to the field covering such topics as finding your stamp in a catalogue, design variations, watermarks, printing methods and papers.

Understanding Stamp Values
The subject of stamp valuation is a deceptively complex one. While at first glance, determining the value of a stamp might appear to be a simple matter of turning to one of the many available reference catalogues, in fact the stamp catalogue is just the beginning of the process. This overview presents some of the major topics in stamp valuation, setting you on course to making confident purchases and understanding the ultimate worth of your collection.

The Grinnell Missionaries - Stamp Collecting's Greatest Controversy
First seen in 1919 when high school teacher and stamp collector George Grinnell claimed to have discovered dozens of rare early Hawaiian stamps, the Grinnell Missionaries have become perhaps the longest running controversy in stamp collecting. To this day experts and collectors alike still debate whether they are clever forgeries or the find of a lifetime.



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